Not stamp collecting

jtotheizzoe:

Richard Feynman discusses why there is a difference between the past and the future, in this clip from his legendary 1964 lecture series at Cornell: The Character of Physical Law.

It’s well worth taking 45 minutes out of your day to hear Dr. F explain why the workings of nature unfold in one direction. You see, while we innately know that the future is different from the past, and so much of our conscious experience is built around the fundamental just-so-ness of time moving forward, the equations of physics describing phenomena from gravity to friction can be run in either direction without breaking the rules. Yet irreversibility is what we observe.

That’s where entropy and probability come into play. When we take into account complex systems, like the jiggles and wiggles of the uncountable atoms that make up our bodies and this chair and my coffee and our world and even out to the scale of the universe itself, there is simply a greater chance that things will become more disordered than less. It’s not that the universe can’t run in reverse, it’s just that there are so many other ways for it not to.

Or as Feynman says, nature is irreversible because of “the general accidents of life”.

This seven-part series, which Open Culture has assembled in its entirety, captures the physicist in his prime, one year before he won the Nobel Prize and became a household name. Feynman was seemingly born for the scientific stage. He had this uncanny ability to weave profound observations of the universe’s inner workings with off-the-cuff (and often brash) humor. James Gleick wrote of Feynman’s unique style and skill:

He had a mystique that came in part from sheer pragmatic brilliance–in any group of scientists he could create a dramatic impression by slashing his way through a difficult problem–and in part, too, from his personal style–rough-hewn, American, seemingly uncultivated.

This clip was a huge influence on my recent video Why Does Time Exist? Although my take scarcely measures up to Dr. Feynman, you can watch below:

xysciences:

Flame tests for Lithium, Strontium, Sodium, Copper and Potassium.

xysciences:

Flame tests for Lithium, Strontium, Sodium, Copper and Potassium.

skunkbear:

This just in: spiders tune the silk threads of their webs like guitar strings
… and they use the distinct vibrational frequencies to help them locate meals and mates. Hear the full story of these good vibrations, from NPR’s Christopher Joyce, here. 
And watch our video!:

skunkbear:

This just in: spiders tune the silk threads of their webs like guitar strings

… and they use the distinct vibrational frequencies to help them locate meals and mates. Hear the full story of these good vibrations, from NPR’s Christopher Joyce, here

And watch our video!:

jtotheizzoe:

Richard Feynman explains the scientific method, from his 1964 lectures at Cornell

"If it disagrees with experiment, it’s wrong. In that simple statement is the key to science."

jtotheizzoe:

Here is physicist Nima Arkani-Hamed’s take:

It’s not fashion, it’s not sociology. It’s not something that you might find beautiful today but won’t find beautiful 10 years from now. The things that we find beautiful today we suspect would be beautiful for all eternity. And the reason is, what…

oupacademic:


When Sir Isaac Newton died in 1727, he left behind no will and an enormous stack of papers. His surviving correspondences, notes, and manuscripts contain an estimated 10 million words, enough to fill up roughly 150 novel-length books. There are pages upon pages of scientific and mathematical brilliance. But there are also pages that reveal another side of Newton, a side his descendants tried to keep hidden from the public.

Wired reviews The Newton Papers: The Strange and True Odyssey of Isaac Newton’s Manuscripts, by Sarah Dry.
Image: Isaac Newton by Sir Godfrey Kneller. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

oupacademic:

When Sir Isaac Newton died in 1727, he left behind no will and an enormous stack of papers. His surviving correspondences, notes, and manuscripts contain an estimated 10 million words, enough to fill up roughly 150 novel-length books. There are pages upon pages of scientific and mathematical brilliance. But there are also pages that reveal another side of Newton, a side his descendants tried to keep hidden from the public.

Wired reviews The Newton Papers: The Strange and True Odyssey of Isaac Newton’s Manuscripts, by Sarah Dry.

Image: Isaac Newton by Sir Godfrey Kneller. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

thescienceofreality:

#YesAllWomen tweets reveal persistent sexism in science By Fiona MacDonald via ScienceAlert. | Image Credit: First three images via ScienceAlert via Twitter, fourth image via Twitter.

Reading through the tweets on the #yesallwomen hashtag is heartbreaking, illuminating and frustrating all at the same time. 

And if you’re a woman, you’ll be nodding along to nine out of 10 of them.

The hashtag started after it was revealed that 22-year-old Elliot Rodger, lead suspect in the Isla Vista shooting, had shared extremely disturbing and misogynistic views in a video posted shortly before the attack.

Instead of flooding the internet with Rodger-specific fury, Twitter took the discussion to the next level and remind the world that sexism is still very much present across society, and #YesAllWomen experience it.

Among those tweets were many honest and confronting admissions of sexism from female scientists, students and communicators.

This isn’t the first time the issue of misogyny in science has been brought up, but it’s always sad and shocking to see certain opinions persist when females have come such a long way in the field.

As ScienceAlert is staffed almost entirely by women, we though we’d add a few of our own:

Because only 44 out of 835 Nobel Prize laureates are women.

Because senior scientists would still rather hire males, and pay them more.

Because people are still shocked when we tell them ScienceAlert is run by women.

Because that last tweet I screenshotted, via Hannah Hart, really hits home for myself and so many women I’ve talked to over the last few days [much less ever] when it comes to pointing out sexism in general, especially within the STEM world. 

rollership:

Daisy found near the Fukushima nuclear disaster site in Japan.

rollership:

Daisy found near the Fukushima nuclear disaster site in Japan.

jtotheizzoe:

wefuckinglovescience:

'Fire rainbows'. The rainbow effect is created when tiny ice crystals in the water vapour of clouds reflect the sunlight at the exact right angle. The sight is rare and has only ever been photographed a couple of times. Images: (L) Ken Rotberg (R) UC Santa Barbara Geography, via ScienceAlert.

These are beautiful. Fire rainbows are neither made of fire, nor are they a rainbow (discuss). They are caused by light refracting through hexagonal ice crystals high in the atmosphere at a 46 degree angle from the light source. In contrast, regular rainbows (which refract through liquid water) occur in a 42 degree arc.But fire rainbows are not that rare. They have been photographed hundreds, if not thousands of times. I mean, there’s 4 photos here, which is more than a couple. Does not compute.

jtotheizzoe:

wefuckinglovescience:

'Fire rainbows'.

The rainbow effect is created when tiny ice crystals in the water vapour of clouds reflect the sunlight at the exact right angle. The sight is rare and has only ever been photographed a couple of times.

Images: (L) Ken Rotberg (R) UC Santa Barbara Geography, via ScienceAlert.

These are beautiful. Fire rainbows are neither made of fire, nor are they a rainbow (discuss). They are caused by light refracting through hexagonal ice crystals high in the atmosphere at a 46 degree angle from the light source. In contrast, regular rainbows (which refract through liquid water) occur in a 42 degree arc.

But fire rainbows are not that rare. They have been photographed hundreds, if not thousands of times. I mean, there’s 4 photos here, which is more than a couple. Does not compute.